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Seeing Light As Controlled By Time

Dear Kryon, I've been pondering your statements about light and multidimensionality, and something occurred to me today. I'm not sure if this is a flash of insight or just plain crazy. I’d appreciate it if you could tell me if I’m on the right track. Have we missed something about light that’s blindingly obvious? We live in 4D space-time. Does light experience time? Light is a massless particle, according to physicists. My “insight” or “crazy idea” is that light is in another dimension than 4D space-time. If this is right, then is it just our perception that needs to change?



Yes, the perceptions need to change. Instead of seeing light outside of time, you must start seeing light as controlled by time. It may not experience time, but its attributes (speed, especially) are controlled by it. Why does light travel at all? What is the engine behind it? When you look at the core energy of reality, it demands that light be related to time. But since time is different for many parts of the Universe, then light is not the constant you think it is.


Your insights are good, but you need to carry them still further. Light is indeed partially interdimensional, but it’s forever locked to formulas about the reality of where it is. Each time-frame will create a different “speed of Light.” This is perhaps the most difficult part of what we teach in astronomy and physics. When you look into space, the light that has come from a far away place is seen as traveling at a constant speed to get to you . . . the same speed as the light that came from the bulb over your head. In fact, this isn’t so. Instead, think of this faraway light as having made a long journey through “light roads” where there were construction delays, stops, and even expressways! It didn’t get here in the simple linear fashion you think it did. Along the way, it reacted to the time frames that it passed through. This will also give you pause to wonder if your distance measurements are accurate, too.


When you begin to discover more about the dark energy (not negative, but unseen) in your Universe, you’ll have to conclude that it’s interdimensional, and therefore some of it’s even in a quantum state (all together, without distance). As soon as you add this attribute to the reality of space, you then must consider that what you’re seeing and measuring as light might actually be far more complex than you thought.


What scientists call the “big bang residue” is an energy left over from a dimensional shift, not an explosion. It creates a reality where you can only see part of it in 4D, and where the energy doesn’t “add up” to the whole you know is there. This will lead you into interdimensional math and eventually to also discover the vents we’ve spoken about. More is coming on this.



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